How To Crochet Shell Edging

how to crochet shell edging scallop scalloped

How to Crochet Shell Edging is the first in a series of 4 tutorials I am writing about different crochet edgings. If you hang around to the end of the series, there will be a free pdf printable of these edgings plus 2 more!

Edgings can be used to decorate all kinds of things, from baby blankets to headbands to crocheted bags. They can be even be added to things that are not crocheted, like hand towels and tea towels as a pretty trim. Heavier weight yarn will give a chunky effect. For something lighter and lacier, you could use embroidery thread and a tiny hook.

Shell edging, also known as scalloped edging is one of my favourites! It looks lovely and it’s very easy to do.how to crochet shell edging scallop scalloped

How to Crochet Shell Edging

Please be aware that being British I have used British crocheting terms!

The edge that you are adding the shells to will need to have a number of stitches divisible by 3.

1. Make 1 chain, then skip the chain and the next 2 stitches.how to crochet shell edging scallop scalloped

2. Into the third stitch, crochet 5 trebles.how to crochet shell edging scallop scallopedhow to crochet shell edging scallop scallopedhow to crochet shell edging scallop scalloped

3. Skip the next 2 stitches. Into the third stitch, make 1 double crochet.how to crochet shell edging scallop scallopedhow to crochet shell edging scallop scalloped

4. Skip the next 2 stitches. Into the third stitch, crochet 5 trebles.how to crochet shell edging scallop scallopedhow to crochet shell edging scallop scallopedhow to crochet shell edging scallop scallopedhow to crochet shell edging scallop scallopedhow to crochet shell edging scallop scalloped

As you can see, the 5 trebles into 1 stitch is what makes the shell pattern.

5. Skip the next 2 stitches, then into the third stitch make 1 double crochet.how to crochet shell edging scallop scalloped

Keep going in this way until you get to the end or, if you are crocheting in the round, back to the start.how to crochet shell edging scallop scalloped

Instead of a double crochet into the last stitch, slip stitch. If you are crocheting in the round, slip stitch into the first chain of the round.how to crochet shell edging scallop scalloped

I used shell edging on this little bowl to pretty it up! The tutorial for the bowl can be found here.

How do you like to use crocheted edgings?

How To Make A Fabric Diary Cover

Even though I have called this post How to Make a Fabric Diary Cover, you could make one to cover a journal or to pretty up a plain notebook.

I made this fabric for my Moleskine diary. The diary itself is fine, lots of space to write my lists, but it’s not pretty. It’s not hideous, it’s completely inoffensive! It’s just a bit plain.

Having sorted out my fabric hoard the other week, I found scraps of fabric that I’d forgotten about, including these lovelies left over from a project I made for Sewing World.fabric diary cover journal notebook

I didn’t enough of any one sort to make a whole fabric diary cover, so I made a bit of a patchwork instead. The cover is lined and there are pockets to slide the cover into. I originally had plans to do something with elastic but I realised (in time, thankfully!) that pockets would be an easier option.fabric diary cover notebook journal

How to Make a Fabric Diary Cover

1. Even if you are making your fabric diary cover from scraps of fabric, it’s easiest if the lining is one piece. Using your diary as a guide, cut a rectangle from the lining fabric. It will need to cover the diary and overhang the cover by about 1.5 cm all the way round (1 cm is the seam allowance, the rest is just extra).fabric diary cover journal notebookfabric diary cover journal notebook

2. Using the lining as a guide, arrange the pieces for the outer and cut them out. Remember to include a seam allowance!

3. Sew the pieces together. Trim the seams and press them open as you go. Check that the outer is the same size as the lining.fabric diary cover journal notebook

4. To make the pen pocket, cut 2 pieces of fabric about the same width as the spine and long enough for a pen. If you are not using a directional print, you could cut one piece twice as long as you need and fold it in half.fabric diary cover journal notebook

5. With the wrong sides together, sew around the sides and bottom. Trim the seams and turn out.fabric diary cover journal notebook

6. Tuck the raw edges inwards and top stitch. This will be the top of the pocket.fabric diary cover journal notebook

7. Pin the pocket to the outer where the spine will be. Sew around the sides and bottom of the pocket.fabric diary cover journal notebook

8. Cut the pieces for the pockets to slide the cover into. They will need to be the same height as the lining and outer. Each pocket needs to be about half the width of each half of the cover.fabric diary cover journal notebook

9. With the wrong sides together, sew one edge of the pocket to the edge of the outer. Repeat for the other pocket.fabric diary cover journal notebook

10. Sew the other short edge of the pocket pieces to the lining. Trim the seams and press them open.

11. Fold the pocket sections in half. Match the seams where the pockets join the outer and lining and pin.fabric diary cover notebook journal

12. Sew along the top and bottom, leaving a gap at the bottom. Trim the seams and turn out. Pin the opening.

13. Fold the pockets inwards along the seams and pin. Top stitch all the way round.fabric diary cover notebook journal

14. Sew a button onto the front of the fabric diary cover.fabric diary cover notebook journal

15. Using ribbon or a piece of elastic, make a loop and fix it to the back. I couldn’t decide! Ribbon looks nicer but elastic is stretchy. I used them both by stretching the elastic as I sewed the ribbon to it.fabric diary cover notebook journalfabric diary cover notebook journal

You could make a bow or use another button to hide the ends.fabric diary cover notebook journal

I just have to remember to actually use my diary now!fabric diary cover notebook journalfabric diary cover notebook journalfabric diary cover notebook journalfabric diary cover notebook journal

You might also like these posts:

Nesting Storage Boxeshow to make nesting fabric storage boxes

Autumn Patchwork Cushionautumn patchwork cushion

Appliqued Flower PurseAppliqued Flower Purse

How To Stop A Dress Form From Falling Over

dress form falling over mannequin tailors dummy

A couple of weeks ago I wrote a post called How to Alter a Dress Form. I have had my dress form, Betty, for a few years and she was too big. As I couldn’t use she was clutter that I just don’t have the room for, so I made the decision to get her to the right side or get rid of her.

A couple of hours and 1 sharp knife later and she’s a much better fit.

What I didn’t mention however was Betty’s other problem.

Not only was she the wrong size, she kept falling over!dress form falling over mannequin tailors dummy

She had been supplied with detachable legs that bolted on but they wouldn’t stay put.

Every time somebody walked past her, she fell over.

Every time one of my boys hit her with a toy car, she fell over.

A couple of times all I did was cast a glance in Betty’s general direction and she fell over!

This was one of the reasons why I was actually favouring throwing her out. Getting her to the right size was fine, but the fact that she was too big in the top half was only part of the problem.

So once I had managed to get Betty to more or less the right size, I set about fixing the legs.

First of all I tried tightening up the bolts. Unfortunately one of them had fallen off and had possibly disappeared up the hoover. Ferreting around under the furniture yielded no results, although I did discover a quantity of Lego.dress form falling over mannequin tailors dummy

Next I tried a combination of wood glue and tightening up the bolts that had not been eaten by the hoover. That didn’t work either. The legs still moved about.

So it was time to get creative!

I needed a stand that could be attached to the bottom of stand where the legs went, that would be the right size and would not fall over.

After chewing the idea over for 10 minutes or so, I hit on the perfect solution.

A Christmas tree stand!dress form falling over mannequin tailors dummy

A Christmas tree stand is adjustable (you can’t tell exactly how thick the trunk’s going to be), would attach to the base of the stand (the bottom of Betty’s stand is similar to the trunk of a small Christmas tree) and stable (nobody wants their Christmas tree to squish their toddler or mangle their pet).

We have a fake tree so I needed to buy a stand.

If you decide to do this yourself, the Christmas Tree stand I bought was this one from Amazon.

I attached it to Betty and it worked!dress form falling over mannequin tailors dummy

You might find it necessary to sand the bits of the dress form’s stand where the metal bits of the Christmas tree base will go to make then flatter.dress form falling over mannequin tailors dummy

If it doesn’t feel stable enough, you could fill the cavity of the Christmas tree stand with bean bags or you could make little bags and fill them with rice to weight it down.

I’m so happy I can use my dress form again. It’s the right size and it doesn’t fall over!

A Crocheted Bowl Pattern

crocheted bowl pattern

A Crocheted Bowl Pattern is the 4th in a series of posts I’ve been writing about storage ideas that you can make quickly and easily! crocheted bowl patternIf you haven’t seen the previous posts in this series, you might like to check them out.

A Drawstring Bag From a Pillowcasehow to make a drawstring bag from a pillowcase

Nesting Fabric Storage Boxeshow to make nesting fabric storage boxes

Storage Bag With Pocketsstorage bag thumbnail

This little crocheted bowl is worked in a circle using double and treble crochet. The edge of the bowl is finished with picot edging.crocheted bowl pattern

To make a larger bowl, you could either use heavier weight yarn and a larger hook, or when making the base of the bowl, you can continue increasing for more rounds instead of just 8, then continue with the pattern.

How to Make a Crocheted Bowl

Please be aware that being English I have used British crocheting terms! At the end of each round, join the last stitch to the first with a slip stitch.

Make 4 ch, join with ss OR make a magic ring.

1. 6 dc into the ring. Join with ss.

2. 1 ch, then *2 dc into next st* 6 times. 12 stitches.

3. 1 ch, then *1 dc into next st, 2 dc into next st* 6 times. 18 stitches.

4. 1 ch, then  *1 dc into next st, 1 dc into next st, 2 dc into next st* 6 times. 24 stitches.

5. 1 ch, then *1 dc into each of next 3 st, 2 dc into next st* 6 times. 30 stitches.

6. 1 ch, then *1 dc into each of next 4 st, 2 dc into next st* 6 times. 36 stitches.

7. 1 ch, then *1 dc into each of next 5 st, 2 dc into next st* 6 times. Join with ss. 42 stitches.

8. 1 ch, then *1 dc into each of next 6 st, 2 dc into next st* 6 times. 46 stitches.

9. 1 ch, then 1 dc into each stitch.

10. 1 ch, then 1 ch, then *1 dc into each of next 7 st, 2 dc into next st* 6 times. 54 stitches.

11. 1 ch, then 1 dc into each stitch.

12. 1 ch, then 1 ch, then *1 dc into each of next 8 st, 2 dc into next st* 6 times. 60 stitches.

13. 1 ch, then 1 dc into each stitch.

14. Repeat row 13.

15. 2 ch, then 1 tr into each stitch.

16. 1 ch, then 1 dc into each stitch.

17. Repeat row 15.

18. Repeat row 16.

19. This row makes the shell edging. 2 ch, then 4 tr into 3rd st from hook, *1 dc into 3rd stitch along, 5 tr into next 3rd stitch along* until the edging has been made all the way round.

Cut yarn and weave in ends.

I’m going to be using my little crocheted bowl for all the bits of Lego that find their way into the washing machine!

I used this yarn from Hobbycraft and a 3.5 mm crochet hook from this set from Amazon. These are affiliate links.
crocheted bowl patterncrocheted bowl patterncrocheted bowl patterncrocheted bowl pattern

The Best Things About Winter

best things about winter

I know this might make me odd, but I like winter. I don’t mind the cold. That’s what warm coats and boots and gloves are for! Summer’s fine, but I don’t like being too hot. Given a choice, I prefer the colder months.

Having said that, I live in the UK where we don’t have very much snow (last year it didn’t snow at all) and it is rare for it to hang around for more than a week. Mild winters are probably easier to tolerate than harsh, snowy winters.winter best things pinterest

It is cold though, and dark early. It can be tempting to wish away your life to the next season, especially once Christmas is over, but instead I like to enjoy it! Here are some of the things I love about winter.

The Best Things About Winter

Snuggly Throws

My boys, especially Boy 2, like to wrap themselves up in blankets. Usually this happens in the evening once they’re changed for bed, but they have been known to stomp around the house draped in blankets in the middle of the day!

Snuggly throws make the place feel cosier and I can always wrap myself up in one if the need arises (and if there are any spare once my boys have grabbed them!). I made this orange throw last year and it gets a lot of use.fleece blanket throw best things about winter

Wearing Jersey

Jersey must be the most comfortable thing known to humankind.

simple dress without a pattern best things about winterThis is a dress I made at the end of the winter last year. I’d had the jersey in my hoard for a couple of years before I finally got around to making something from it. I didn’t use a pattern and it’s very simple. It is the most comfortable thing I own. It’s actually like wearing pyjamas! It’s warmer than cotton and, being stretchy, you don’t have to faff with putting a zip in!

Using the Slow Cooker All the Time

I love my slow cooker. In the winter I have it going most days. I can chuck the stuff in it in the morning and by teatime it’s ready. During the day I can enjoy the delicious smells coming from the kitchen. It’s such a shame people never want to eat casseroles in the summer!

Beautiful Winter Dayswinter colour palette best things about winter

This is one of my favourite favourite things about winter. When the sky is clear, the sun is shining and the air is crisp and cold. It’s easy to only look down and just see the mud, but if you look up, it can’t help but chase away the winter blues.

Grey Daysbest things about winter

Clear days are an obvious choice, but I even like the grey days. They have a wintry beauty all of their own.

Coming Home Out of the Cold

It’s always lovely to come home to a warm house after you’ve been out, especially if the slow cooker’s going and you’re reminded that you don’t have to sort dinner out because it’s already done! It’s almost as though my funny old house knows I prefer winter. In the summer it’s stifling, but in wintertime it’s much nicer, cosy and concooning and even the clutter is comforting.

Lamps, Candles, Firelight

There’s nothing like the cosy feeling a real fire or even a lamp can give. Even though we live in the country, we don’t have real fire, so we make do with a bioethanol fireplace. It smells a bit weird but it’s almost as good as the real thing.

Dark Evenings

I like dark evenings for 2 reasons. The first is because of the cosiness of being indoors  when it’s dark and cold. The second is that it is so much easier to put young children to bed! Nobody wants to go to sleep when it’s light outside and people who are prone to waking up early are more likely to when there’s bright sunshine streaming in and the birds are all singing loudly! So in winter I can pack them off to bed early then I’ve got more time to make stuff. Yay!

This does not work so well once they learn to tell the time.

My Cat

When it’s summer, the cat is out all the time. When it’s winter however, he’s indoors, adorning the place with his beautiful furry self. He’s not a lap cat, but he will sit on your feet and warm them up nicely.best things about winter

Crochetinghow to crochet cable stitch

I always crochet more in the winter than in the summer. I don’t want to think about cosy blankets or scarves or mug cosies when it’s warm.

The Winter House


This is a little ebook written by Alison May of Brocante Home. In it she describes everything I love about winter. It includes puttery treats, which are little tasks we can set ourselves to make life just a little bit nicer, housekeeping recipes, books to read and journalling prompts. Some of the tasks are crafts, most of them are home related. Even if you don’t like winter, I’m pretty sure that doing just some of these things will have you at least considering changing your mind!

What do you like best about winter?

This posts contains affiliate links.

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